Stocks and News
Home | Week in Review Process | Terms of Use | About UsContact Us
   Articles Go Fund Me All-Species List Hot Spots Go Fund Me
Week in Review   |  Bar Chat    |  Hot Spots    |   Dr. Bortrum    |   Wall St. History
Stock and News: Hot Spots
  Search Our Archives: 
 

 

Hot Spots

http://www.gofundme.com/s3h2w8

AddThis Feed Button
   

08/22/2013

Pakistan's Strategy vs. India

Due to a number of incidents on the India-Pakistan border in disputed Kashmir, relations between the two nuclear powers have deteriorated, just as the peace process was to have been restarted.

Manpreet Sethi, ICSSR senior fellow at the Centre for Air Power Studies, New Delhi, had some of the following comments in Defense News on Pakistan’s strategy for its nuclear arms.

[Excerpts]

“Since Pakistan announced the first test of the 60-kilometer Nasr ballistic missile in 2011, there is an implicit assumption in Western writings that India will respond to the Pakistani move toward tactical nuclear weapons (TNW) with similar weapons of its own.

“However, this is precisely what India’s response should not be, and is unlikely to be, if the country and the rest of the international community correctly read the signals from Rawalpindi.

“The primary task of Pakistan’s nuclear weapons is not to deter India’s nuclear weapons but to avoid having to engage a superior military capability. Pakistan believes that its low nuclear threshold constrains India from militarily punishing it.

“India, meanwhile, maintains there is space to fight a conventional war despite nuclear weapons. The concept of limited war, a series of quick cross-border strikes whose objective would not be to occupy Pakistani territory but to deliver a punishing blow, has been conceived in this context. This alarms Pakistan because if India can tailor a conventional response to remain below its red lines, then its nuclear weapons fail in their objective.

“Pakistan has to keep its nuclear weapons relevant to deter an Indian conventional response. Pakistan, in fact, is not seeking to redress the conventional balance through the use of these weapons but to deter a conventional war through the threat of their use.

“It has no illusions about the military effectiveness of the weapon but seeks to create an environment that deters India. In fact, Pakistan appears to view TNW as being a more effective deterrent than relying solely on the threat of large-scale, long-range nuclear strikes. The attraction of this option is likely to increase as the conventional military balance with India grows more adverse. 

“Pakistani decision-makers well understand that even a single use of a TNW could trigger tragic consequences. But, they believe they would not have to use the TNW because the risk of nuclear escalation would deter. Therefore, Pakistani nuclear strategy, which has always relied on brinkmanship, has found in TNW another tool to keep India, and by extension the international community, on the edge.

“The TNWs are meant to send two messages: One, that their use would be so stunning it would force India to halt hostilities or face the prospect of further escalation; and secondly, that the use of a low-yield battlefield weapon would not be seen as provocation enough by India or the international community to merit nuclear retaliation.

“Pakistan believes India would not have the will, the motivation, the flexibility or the incentive to act. Therefore, Pakistan is not miscalculating India’s capability but its credibility to act.”

---

But, as Ms. Sethi writes, “If Pakistan develops these weapons, deployment will follow, which means delegated command and control, with its obvious challenges of nuclear security and risks of inadvertent, mistaken or unauthorized launch.”

Hot Spots returns in a few weeks...after Labor Day.

Brian Trumbore



AddThis Feed Button

 

-08/22/2013-      
Web Epoch NJ Web Design  |  (c) Copyright 2016 StocksandNews.com, LLC.

Hot Spots

08/22/2013

Pakistan's Strategy vs. India

Due to a number of incidents on the India-Pakistan border in disputed Kashmir, relations between the two nuclear powers have deteriorated, just as the peace process was to have been restarted.

Manpreet Sethi, ICSSR senior fellow at the Centre for Air Power Studies, New Delhi, had some of the following comments in Defense News on Pakistan’s strategy for its nuclear arms.

[Excerpts]

“Since Pakistan announced the first test of the 60-kilometer Nasr ballistic missile in 2011, there is an implicit assumption in Western writings that India will respond to the Pakistani move toward tactical nuclear weapons (TNW) with similar weapons of its own.

“However, this is precisely what India’s response should not be, and is unlikely to be, if the country and the rest of the international community correctly read the signals from Rawalpindi.

“The primary task of Pakistan’s nuclear weapons is not to deter India’s nuclear weapons but to avoid having to engage a superior military capability. Pakistan believes that its low nuclear threshold constrains India from militarily punishing it.

“India, meanwhile, maintains there is space to fight a conventional war despite nuclear weapons. The concept of limited war, a series of quick cross-border strikes whose objective would not be to occupy Pakistani territory but to deliver a punishing blow, has been conceived in this context. This alarms Pakistan because if India can tailor a conventional response to remain below its red lines, then its nuclear weapons fail in their objective.

“Pakistan has to keep its nuclear weapons relevant to deter an Indian conventional response. Pakistan, in fact, is not seeking to redress the conventional balance through the use of these weapons but to deter a conventional war through the threat of their use.

“It has no illusions about the military effectiveness of the weapon but seeks to create an environment that deters India. In fact, Pakistan appears to view TNW as being a more effective deterrent than relying solely on the threat of large-scale, long-range nuclear strikes. The attraction of this option is likely to increase as the conventional military balance with India grows more adverse. 

“Pakistani decision-makers well understand that even a single use of a TNW could trigger tragic consequences. But, they believe they would not have to use the TNW because the risk of nuclear escalation would deter. Therefore, Pakistani nuclear strategy, which has always relied on brinkmanship, has found in TNW another tool to keep India, and by extension the international community, on the edge.

“The TNWs are meant to send two messages: One, that their use would be so stunning it would force India to halt hostilities or face the prospect of further escalation; and secondly, that the use of a low-yield battlefield weapon would not be seen as provocation enough by India or the international community to merit nuclear retaliation.

“Pakistan believes India would not have the will, the motivation, the flexibility or the incentive to act. Therefore, Pakistan is not miscalculating India’s capability but its credibility to act.”

---

But, as Ms. Sethi writes, “If Pakistan develops these weapons, deployment will follow, which means delegated command and control, with its obvious challenges of nuclear security and risks of inadvertent, mistaken or unauthorized launch.”

Hot Spots returns in a few weeks...after Labor Day.

Brian Trumbore