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02/08/2013

Housing Update

Time for my quarterly update of the housing situation in the United States, using the National Association of Realtors’ (NAR) database for existing home prices.

This time we look back at the second half of the year. Spring is around the corner so activity will no doubt pick up, as should prices, and almost all are in agreement that a recovery is well underway. The following is the national median home price.

2012

July...$187,800
Aug....$184,900
Sept...$178,300
Oct....$176,900
Nov...$179,400
Dec...$180,800 [preliminary]

2011

July…$171,200
Aug…$171,200
Sept…$165,300
Oct….$160,800
Nov…$164,000
Dec…$162,200

2010

July…$182,100
Aug…$177,300
Sept…$171,400
Oct….$170,600
Nov…$170,200
Dec…$168,800

2009

July…$181,300
Aug…$177,200
Sept…$175,900
Oct….$172,000
Nov…$170,000
Dec…$170,500

Using the NAR’s data, the median average for a full year was as follows.

2004…$185,200
2005…$219,600
2006…$221,900*
2007…$219,000
2008…$198,100
2009…$172,500
2010…$172,900
2011…$166,100
2012....$176,600 [preliminary]

*Existing home prices peaked in July 2006 at $230,200… according to NAR. You can play around with the numbers any way you want but generally you’re talking of a ‘formal’ decline of 30%, peak to trough. That’s the national figure. Of course the damage elsewhere was far worse.

Source: realtor.org

Wall Street History will return in two weeks.

Brian Trumbore
 



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Wall Street History

02/08/2013

Housing Update

Time for my quarterly update of the housing situation in the United States, using the National Association of Realtors’ (NAR) database for existing home prices.

This time we look back at the second half of the year. Spring is around the corner so activity will no doubt pick up, as should prices, and almost all are in agreement that a recovery is well underway. The following is the national median home price.

2012

July...$187,800
Aug....$184,900
Sept...$178,300
Oct....$176,900
Nov...$179,400
Dec...$180,800 [preliminary]

2011

July…$171,200
Aug…$171,200
Sept…$165,300
Oct….$160,800
Nov…$164,000
Dec…$162,200

2010

July…$182,100
Aug…$177,300
Sept…$171,400
Oct….$170,600
Nov…$170,200
Dec…$168,800

2009

July…$181,300
Aug…$177,200
Sept…$175,900
Oct….$172,000
Nov…$170,000
Dec…$170,500

Using the NAR’s data, the median average for a full year was as follows.

2004…$185,200
2005…$219,600
2006…$221,900*
2007…$219,000
2008…$198,100
2009…$172,500
2010…$172,900
2011…$166,100
2012....$176,600 [preliminary]

*Existing home prices peaked in July 2006 at $230,200… according to NAR. You can play around with the numbers any way you want but generally you’re talking of a ‘formal’ decline of 30%, peak to trough. That’s the national figure. Of course the damage elsewhere was far worse.

Source: realtor.org

Wall Street History will return in two weeks.

Brian Trumbore